Complications of mild traumatic brain injury in veterans and military personnel
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Complications of mild traumatic brain injury in veterans and military personnel a systematic review by Maya E. O"Neil

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Published .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Complications,
  • Soldiers,
  • Wounds and injuries,
  • Veterans,
  • Brain

Book details:

About the Edition

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common condition, especially among military members. Twelve to 23 percent of service members returning from Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn (OEF/OIF/OND) experienced a TBI while deployed. Although various criteria are used to define TBI severity, the majority of documented TBI events among OEF/OIF/OND service members may be classified as mild in severity, or mTBI, according to the definition used by the Veterans Health Administration and Department of Defense (VA/DoD). While some researchers suggest most individuals recover within three months of an mTBI, others estimate that 10 to 20 percent of individuals continue to experience post-concussive symptoms (e.g., headaches, dizziness, balance problems) beyond this time fame. This estimate may be higher among OEF/OIF service members given the frequency of multiple TBI events, concomitant mental health conditions such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and other factors unique to combat deployments. As such, deployment-related mTBI is a significant issue for the VA, as patients who report ongoing mTBI symptoms may require the attention from a range of health care professionals. This evidence synthesis review will be used by the VHA TBI Advisory Committee to develop strategies to identify those at-risk for long-term mTBI effects, inform clinical practice, determine resource allocation, and identify future research priorities.

Edition Notes

Statement[principal investigator, Maya Elin O"Neil ; co-investigators and research associates, Kathleen Carlson, Daniel Storzbach, Lisa Brenner, Michele Freeman, Ana Quįones, Makalapua Motu"apuaka, Megan Ensley, Devan Kansagara ; prepared for Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration Quality Enhancement Research Initiative, Health Services Research & Development Service ; prepared by Evidence-based Synthesis Program (ESP) Center, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, OR]
SeriesEvidence-based synthesis program, Evidence-based synthesis program (Series)
ContributionsQuality Enhancement Research Initiative (U.S.), Portland VA Medical Center. Evidence-based Synthesis Program Center, United States. Department of Veterans Affairs
The Physical Object
Paginationiv, 157 pages
Number of Pages157
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL27169195M
ISBN 101499181213
ISBN 109781499181210
OCLC/WorldCa893426252

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Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common condition, especially among military members. Twelve to 23 percent of service members returning from Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn (OEF/OIF/OND) experienced a TBI while deployed. Although various criteria are used to define TBI severity, the majority of documented TBI events among OEF/OIF/OND service members may be Cited by: Complications of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Veterans Evidence-based Synthesis Programand Military Personnel: A Systematic Review groups,24 Only one study reported prevalence of sleep disturbance, estimated at 13% (less thanfour hours of sleep per night) to 23% (more than 2 hours sleep loss per night) for active dutymilitary personnel. Get this from a library! Complications of mild traumatic brain injury in veterans and military personnel: a systematic review. [Maya E O'Neil; Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (U.S.),; Portland VA Medical Center. Evidence-based Synthesis Program Center,; United States. Department of Veterans Affairs,] -- Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common condition, especially among military members. Traumatic brain injury is the most common combat-related injury. Here is a summary of symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of TBI.

Military combat is a well-recognized risk factor for traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), including penetrating brain injuries, blast-related TBIs, and injuries due to motor vehicle accidents, falls, assaults, and other biomechanical force exposures. The vast majority of these injuries are . Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a wound that was unheard of just a few short years ago. It occurs when a sudden trauma or head injury disrupts the function of the brain. Before modern-day medical. A traumatic brain injury (TBI), also known as an intracranial injury, is an injury to the brain caused by an external force. TBI can be classified based on severity, mechanism (closed or penetrating head injury) or other features (e.g., occurring in a specific location or over a widespread area).Head injury is a broader category that may involve damage to other structures such as the scalp and Specialty: Neurosurgery, pediatrics. Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) among UK military personnel whilst deployed in Afghanistan in Brain Inj 28(7): 2. The American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine () Definition of mild traumatic brain injury. J Head Trauma Rehabil 8(3): 3. Sharp DJ, Jenkins PO () Concussion is confusing us all. Pract Neurol 15(3 File Size: KB.

Events that lead to traumatic brain injury are often also psychologically traumatic. Addressing a growing need among mental health practitioners, this authoritative book brings together experts in both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).5/5(9). The guideline describes the critical decision points in the Management of Concussion/mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) and provides clear and comprehensive evidence based recommendations incorporating current information and practices for practitioners throughout the DoD and VA . Prognosis formild traumatic brain injury: results of theWHOCollaborating Centre Task Force on mild traumatic brain injury. J. Rehabil. Med. S84–S Schretlen, D.J. & A.M. Shapiro. A quantitative review of the effects of traumatic brain injury on . More t US military personnel were injured and a substantial percentage of those deployed suffered post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and other neuropsychological.